The tech industry is experiencing rapid growth in America, with employment in all computer-based occupations expected to rise 20 percent through the year 2022. This development is in response to the widespread expansion of technology in key areas of industry, such as health care and mobile applications. It is no surprise that there is a corresponding increased demand for software developers, computer programmers and other well-trained tech professionals. In fact, Forbes reports that there is a concerning shortage of qualified computer programmers, and The Wall Street Journal suggests that this shortage will only intensify with the introduction of new programming languages. As Web-based devices and applications continue to gain popularity (last year, 58 percent of American adults owned a smartphone), tech professionals will continue to play a central role in the functioning of everyday life.

Coding Bootcamps Offer a Solution to the Tech Professional Shortage

With a shortage of tech-savvy professionals and an expected increase in demand, how can the market keep up? For many, coding bootcamps are the answer. “A new educational institution, the coding boot camp, is quietly emerging as the vocational school for the digital age, devoted to creating software developers,” according to a story in The New York Times. They reflect “the start-up ethic: small for-profit enterprises that are fast [and] nimble.” Aside from the increased access they provide, bootcamps also report high employment rates upon completion: “In a recent survey of 48 boot camps, Course Report, an online boot camp directory, found that three-quarters of graduates were employed, with raises averaging 44 percent from their pre-bootcamp pay and an average salary of $76,000.” More than 60 of these bootcamps have been founded across the country since 2012. People from all walks of life are attracted to bootcamps for this very reason. From individuals seeking to change careers to students who have recently left college, bootcamps provide a direct path to in-demand, well-paying careers in the tech industry.

“In a recent survey of 48 boot camps, Course Report, an online boot camp directory, found that three-quarters of graduates were employed, with raises averaging 44 percent from their pre-bootcamp pay and an average salary of $76,000.”

– The New York Times

All About The Software Guild

In medieval Europe, guilds brought skilled craftsmen together to share knowledge and foster consistent quality. Those who were ready to learn became apprentices and developed skills needed for entrance into the guild. Similarly, The Software Guild’s coding bootcamp combines the knowledge of master craftsmen with the skills apprentices need to succeed in software development careers. This learning model has been effective for centuries and continues to produce significant results and success. The Software Guild is an intensive, fast-paced program that teaches the skills required to be a software developer. In this full-time, 12-week course, apprentices learn either .NET/C# or Java and acquire the skills needed for entry-level positions. The program, which combines face-to-face lectures with hands-on experience, enables our apprentices to build strong portfolios to aid in their job search.

Why Choose The Software Guild?

The Software Guild’s coding bootcamp teaches the skills Fortune 500 companies desire for entry-level programmer positions, meaning that apprentices are prepared to enter the software development field upon completion. Because .NET/C# and Java are among the most frequently used programming languages for websites, The Software Guild’s apprentices are immersed in the world of programming, allowing them to start a new career quickly. And with more than 100 companies in its employer network, The Software Guild can connect graduates to jobs faster.

In just 12 weeks, the bootcamp gives apprentices a foundation in writing code, teaching them to use tools, techniques and technologies that are needed by the industries that drive the economy — health care, finance, retail, manufacturing, e-commerce and more.

The Software Guild provides a way for those looking to change or accelerate their careers to do so in a comprehensive format. Apprentices learn to think like professional coders and write effective, efficient code. Classes are taught by master coders who know what businesses are looking for in employees. Small class sizes ensure personal attention from instructors and mentors, meaning that graduates gain knowledge that can be immediately applied to careers.

Curriculum

Depending on the chosen language, Software Guild apprentices gain the following competencies:

.NET/C#

  • Object Oriented Programming
  • Debugging Techniques
  • Unit Testing and Test Driven Development
  • Common Architecture Patterns
  • Data and Class Modeling

JAVA

  • Object Oriented Programming
  • Debugging Techniques
  • Unit Testing and Test Driven Development
  • Common Architecture Patterns
  • Data and Class Modeling

.NET/C#

  • ASP .NET MVC5
  • RESTful Web Interfaces with WebAPI

JAVA

  • Servlets/JSP
  • MVC
  • Web Services
  • Spring

.NET/C#

  • SQL Server 2012
  • SQL Reporting Services
  • ADO .NET
  • Entity Framework
  • Dapper

JAVA

  • MySQL
  • JDBC
  • Spring JDBC
  • JPA

.NET/C#

  • HTML5
  • CSS
  • JavaScript
  • jQuery
  • AngularJS
  • Bootstrap

JAVA

  • HTML5
  • CSS
  • JavaScript
  • jQuery
  • AngularJS
  • Bootstrap

.NET/C#

  • Visual Studio
  • NUnit
  • Git

JAVA

  • NetBeans
  • JUnit
  • Git
  • Maven/Ant

Coding Questions Answered

Eric Wise, The Software Guild’s chief academic officer, gave insight into essential information that those who are thinking about applying should know.

What would you describe as the main differences between .NET/C# and Java?

Java and C# are both in the top tier of in-demand languages for developer jobs. C# actually came out a bit after Java and is heavily influenced by the Java language and syntax. For this reason, you will find a lot of similarities between the two, even so far as some of our .NET employers will hire Java students and vice versa because transitioning from one to the other is pretty easy. The main difference arises from Java’s popularity in mobile Android development, because it is native, while C# tends to be more prevalent in companies that use Microsoft technologies and in game design because the Unity Game Studio features C# as one of its prominent supported languages.

What is unique to each language? Are there any characteristics that potential apprentices may want to know about before they choose?

Java is winning hands down in mobile development due to its ties to Android. ASP .NET runs more of the Internet websites than Java does. I tend to think the tooling in .NET is better; Microsoft makes great tools, so that can make C# a bit more approachable to learn.

What would be the main determining factor for choosing between the two languages? What would a student need to know (about themselves, future career goals, the languages themselves) to make the decision?

I recommend doing research in the area you live. Check out the companies that hire developers and what languages they are looking for. Play the odds, and if there are more jobs in a certain language in your area, place your bets there. I suppose if you are more front-end focused, .NET might be a better experience, and if you are mobile development or back-end focused, Java may be better, but the differences are minor enough that I say focus on job opportunities instead.

Is there anything else you want to add that you think is important for potential apprentices to know?

The only constant in this field is change. One of the main things we look for other than technical aptitude in this program is passion for technology and eagerness to learn. Over the course of your career, you are going to have to continue learning new frameworks and techniques. If exploring new ideas is not something you enjoy (some people get stressed out by learning under deadlines), then this field probably isn’t for you.

 

Job Outlook After Bootcamp

Coding-based jobs are on the rise, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. There is a striking return on investment for graduates of The Software Guild. Employment growth for computer programmers, or coders, is expected to keep pace with the national average at 8 percent. The average annual salary is impressive, at more than $74,000. Software developers, also known as software engineers, are in even more demand, with projected growth of 22 percent through 2022. This rate is much faster than the national average for all occupations. In terms of salary, software developers can expect to earn median pay of $93,350 per year.

Admission to Bootcamp

Before admission to The Software Guild, all potential apprentices are asked to take an aptitude test and complete a brief interview. This test helps determine skill level, gauge enthusiasm for programming as a career and ensure aptitude to complete the bootcamp successfully. There is also one important decision to make before enrolling: Which coding language do you want to learn? Both .NET/C# and Java are formidable coding languages in their own right, with specific applications and uses in the tech industry.

Why wait to start your career? Apply today.