Illustrated infographic about the famous women programmers of NASA who put men on the moon.

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Follow in Famous Female Programmers Footsteps

Today, women of NASA make up one-third of the organization’s workforce. Throughout industries, female programmers hold only 25% of computing jobs, a number in decline. If you’re a woman ready to push boundaries, don’t wait. Turn the numbers around with The Software Guild’s coding bootcamps. Learn from instructors with years of industry experience in a hands-on, project-based format.

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Transcript

When the first human landed on the moon, we all heard it was a giant leap for mankind. Now, 50 years later, we know the space landing was also a giant leap for womankind.

Numerous female programmers worked tirelessly and bravely to put men on the moon. Here’s a look at just a few of the remarkable women who broke barriers to go where no man (or woman) had ever gone before.

Margaret Hamilton

“There was no choice but to be pioneers. No time to be beginners.”

  • Born: 1936
  • Worked as a computer scientist at MIT and Director of Apollo Flight Computer Programming [1]
  • Helped develop on-flight software for the Apollo space program
  • Popularized the term “software engineering”
  • Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Mary Jackson

“We have to do something like this to get them interested in science. Sometimes they are not aware of the number of black scientists and don’t even know of the career opportunities until it’s too late.”

  • Born: 1921
  • First black, female engineer for NASA [2]
  • Worked to impact the hiring and promotion of the next generation of women at NASA
  • Received the Apollo Group Achievement Award

Katherine Johnson

“I like to learn. That’s an art and a science.”

  • Born: 1918
  • One of three black students chosen to integrate West Virginia’s graduate schools [3]
  • Earned a Ph.D. in mathematics and graduated with honors
  • Developed calculations that synched Apollo’s Lunar Lander with the moon-orbiting Command and Service Module

JoAnn Morgan

“All of my mentors were men. That’s just a plain fact and that needs to be acknowledged.”

  • Born: 1940
  • Worked as an instrumentation controller for Apollo 11 [4]
  • Became a trainee for the Army at Cape Canaveral at 17-years-old
  • First NASA woman to win a Sloan Fellowship

Frances “Poppy” Northcutt

“I thought it was important that people understand that women can do these jobs — going into science, going into technology, doing something that’s not stereotypical.”

  • Born: 1943
  • Held the title of “computress” before becoming an engineer on the Apollo Program [5]
  • First woman to work in Apollo’s operational support at the Mission Control Center in Houston
  • Fought to improve health benefits for single women at the space center
  • Later became a women’s advocate for Houston and earned her law degree

Dorothy Vaughan

“I changed what I could, and what I couldn’t, I endured.”

  • Born: 1910
  • Worked on the space program as one of many African Americans considered NASA “human computers” [6]
  • Was the space program’s first black supervisor

Today, women of NASA make up one-third of the organization’s workforce. [7] Throughout industries, female programmers hold only 25% of computing jobs, a number in decline. [8]

If you’re a woman with a mind for computers, numbers, and problem solving, don’t wait. Turn the numbers around with The Software Guild’s coding bootcamps.

 

Follow in Famous Female Programmers Footsteps

Today, women of NASA make up one-third of the organization’s workforce. Throughout industries, female programmers hold only 25% of computing jobs, a number in decline. If you’re a woman ready to push boundaries, don’t wait. Turn the numbers around with The Software Guild’s coding bootcamps. Learn from instructors with years of industry experience in a hands-on, project-based format.

 

Sources

1. smithsonianmag.com

2. 3. 4. nasa.gov

5. time.com

6. britannica.com

7. siliconangle.com

8. ncwit.org